To Store or Not, That is the Question

Back when we moved house, we had a storage unit for a few months – it helped a lot during the packing to be able to then take boxes that were packed early and store them out of the way.  After moving, I didn’t continue with the unit, as it does cost, and of course I wasn’t expecting real delays in proceedings.

It meant the shed got packed into the garage, into a non functional state as I’m sure regulars are very familiar with!

It got to a crunch point recently where I had to do something, as it was really having a detrimental effect.  Other than making serious moves on the shed, the other thing I needed to do was get back to some semblance of a functional state (at least able to use the drill press, tablesaw and router table – I already had access to a bandsaw and lathe).

The only way to achieve that is to empty some of the garage out.  There is no where to put it though, so again I considered the storage unit option.  Even to the point that I booked a unit ($152/month) and filled the stationwagon for the first trip.

But something was still nagging in the back of my mind.

So before I went to the unit to unload, I took a run down past Masters – to get a padlock for the unit.  But instead of heading to the padlock section, I found myself perusing the isles of sheds, once again.

But there was a difference.  All the sheds I was looking at were on special until the end of the month – over $100 off.  For the price I would spend on 2 months of the storage unit (which is the minimum I anticipated I would need it), I could get a comparable shed (slightly smaller, but still well in the ball park).  Spoke with my better half, who I am sure was very bemused by the prospect of yet another shed, but she agreed with the logic and gave the green light.

So back to the storage unit, who were very obliging and let me bail on the unit, and back to Masters again, and after a bit of indecisiveness, chose a 2.1×2.1 shed.

Was planning on cream (to match the future workshop), but as they didn’t have any, had to opt for green.  But just before loading, the store assistant asked if I had considered the new colour – slate grey.  I hadn’t, but it then dawned on me that although I can’t get cream, the other main colour of the workshop was going to be very similar to slate grey – so sold!  At the checkout however, it turned out the new colour was not part of the sale (was at the full $500), but as it had been offered, they honoured it anyway, and made it $360.  A real win!

So now I have a nearly fully assembled shed (still have the door to go), a car full of gear I have to unload again, and this weekend I am hoping to get to the tablesaw up and running again (and have more of a play with the CNC Shark of course!)  I don’t have 15A power available, so the Promac generator will definitely be required (having twin 15A outputs).

As to the shed – I’ll line the base with a groundsheet, and load it up to the gunnels.  After all this, I could sell it for $60 and still be even, but instead – I know it will not go to waste! (More storage!!)  Still tossing up the idea of the floor kit, just for the ease of it, but at $200 it is a lot for something that can be

It is a cheap shed, no doubt about it.  If it wasn’t cheap, it wouldn’t have been a viable proposition in the first place.

The instructions were much better written than I’d seen before, but still some significant problems never the less.  The shed has some design faults – you’d think after years they would have refined them to the nth degree and have it down pat.  But I guess it isn’t Ikea – they have no idea how to implement quality control on design.  Some real problems, but it could be fudged enough to get it together.  Even after adding the roof, the structure is still unstable.  Needs more bracing in the corners than was provided.

The instructions as I said look a lot better than they used to, but I followed them to a T, and they missed a number of steps.  They really need to take a shed, give it to someone who has either not assembled one before, or who is actually capable of following instructions rather than jumping ahead and actually pick up the errors and missing steps.  Anyway, what do I expect.

I have been looking at some photos of the American Barns being built, and I am so looking forward to getting to assemble a quality unit!  And one that has a structure and doesn’t rely on the cladding for structural integrity.

3 Responses

  1. Just a suggestion. Bunnings have tongue and grooved termite treated particle floorboard at $38 a sheet, two sheets would be enough, use the offcuts in the center. Lay it on the groundsheet or on bearers 🙂

  2. Having recently erected a 4×3 shed, I know exactly what you mean about quality control. My shed though, was purchased 20 years or more ago and never assembled. It sat in my grandfather’s basement till I got hold of it and put it to use. Only thing was, no door panels. The frames and hardware like runners and rollers were there, but no sheeting. It apparently had never been delivered. Off to Bunnings to pick up some 6mm ply to fill it. Much like yours, there was plenty of fudging and cranium scratching moments. I lost count of the number of times I mumbled, “why the hell did they do it like that?”. The ridge beam design on my shed is something I’m sure I will never understand. And the instructions were photocopies.

    My shed also is to be used to empty the basement which is fairly choc-a-block atm, so I can get a shop up and running down there.

    Glad to hear you’re making some kind of head-way. Encourages me to get cracking too!

    • Think they haven’t refined the construction and assembly process at all in those 20 years!

      Well they have slightly, at least this shed had screws for the roofing iron, and didn’t just clip into place. It is the same brand (sadly) as the one I had that ripped apart in a big wind, (although that one was 3x the size), so at least they are now using a couple of screws to hold it together.

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