It has begun!

After two solid weeks of painting, cleaning, rubbish clearing etc, I got into the shed on the final day before returning to work (on Sunday) to begin the great pack.

8 boxes later, and you could not see any difference at all.  So on Tuesday night, I tried again and got another 8 boxes packed, and still – hard to see where it all has come from – just an inkling in one corner that something might be happening.

This is going to be an “interesting” experience.

I had a removalist company out to quote on moving the house and shed contents, and the price came in at  (drumroll please), $6200. So that put paid to that idea.  I would rather put $6k into the construction of the new shed (that’d get the electricals well sorted and then some, or pay for much of the slab etc etc).  For that sort of money, I could buy a really good trailer ($2k), and a pallet truck ($400) and still have heaps left over.  If I had that sort of loose change, I could get a pretty awesome setup of Festool!

So onto plan B.  Doing it ourselves.  It may be hard work, but I will be able to remind myself at every step that this effort is saving us a significant penny.

The shed pack will take a bit to get through the place, but with regular trips out there, it should move on at a pretty steady pace.  Now that I know I will be moving the contents, I can adjust my perception on how I am packing as well – more things can just be dealt with at the time rather than having to ensure that it is well packed 100% before the move date.

Still, I think there will be a bit of a shortage of storage boxes in the world by the time I’ve finished!

Shed Concept

An appealing shed design!

A place for everything…

You know the old saying, and it is a rule I find particularly satisfying when I can apply it.

When the latest Carbatec catalog email came out, one thing that caught my eye was an organiser from Kreg. Now to a certain extent, there are plenty of unbranded organisers out there, but I did like the Kreg toolboxx (and the spelling is deliberate).

There are two versions – the one I got, which is just the toolboxx, along with 1050 assorted Kreg screws (150 of each standard size and thread pitch), and a deeper version which comes with a serious collection of Kreg jigs and clamps. If I didn’t already have a full set of what is in the Master collection, that would have been the one to go for.

If you don’t have a Kreg pockethole jig, this is definitely a good time to give some serious consideration to one. They are not everyone’s cup of tea, but then they can solve a joinery problem where many other methods struggle. It has gotten me out of trouble on a number of occasions.

But back to the case I got, and it got loaded up pretty quickly!

20130218-230114.jpg

The top is secured with the main clamps, so it is not a situation where you can pick up the case with the top accidentally unsecured and send screws everywhere. There are 15 removeable compartments, and three fixed ones (the longest in the middle ideal for the long driver, and the drill bit(s).

I managed to fit all my extra screws in as well (almost), so a total of around 2000 screws fitted in the compartments.

20130218-230753.jpg

To keep track of what screws I have (for reordering if nothing else), I cut the label off each of the boxes I had and laid them on top. I may change this to Dymo labels on the individual compartment, but will decide that at a later stage.

In the lower area, I was easily able to fit the jigs I have and their accessories, all except the Kreg pockethole jig itself. That doesn’t fit for the simple reason that I have mine mounted in a large backing board (30mm thick or so), as documented a ways back (2009) so fitting it in is simply not possible!

20130218-231447.jpg

I have the panel clamp and the pockethole clamp in there, along with the micro pockethole adapter, dust cover, and a portable set of pockethole screws.

20130218-231741.jpg

The one thing I found interesting (disappointing?) are the Kreg screws that came with the toolboxx. Not sure of the quality of the material – don’t have an easy way to test their strength, but the head is different. Unlike the standard Kreg screw, which uses Robertson screws, these are a hybrid of Robertson and Phillips. Hybrid is another word for compromise.

The Robertson drive does not sit as deeply in the screw head, although it did drive in and out multiple times without issue. Overall however, I don’t like the decrease in contact area and the shallower driver position. The Phillips part is heavily compromised, and burred very easily – it could not drive the screw in fully into hardwood without significant slippage and burring, and needed the Robertson to finish driving it home.

I just don’t get the point of the compromise. If you want to use Phillips, use Phillips and accept the problems (driver camming out easily for example), otherwise, stay with the dedicated Robertson screw. I hope it is only the screws that came with the toolboxx that are this compromised, hybrid head, and not the whole Kreg range.

20130218-233437.jpg

Top left, the original Robertson screw type from Kreg, top right is the one that has burred heavily. The Robertson drive can still manage, the Phillips cannot.

No specific mention of a change of head on the Kreg website.

So other than the screws (which are still functional), I am liking the toolboxx! Available from Carbatec.

Cleaning House

For the past two weeks, I have been working solidly on getting ready to move. All those jobs that you know are there, and you’ll get around to at some stage (or not).

20130217-092823.jpg

So much painting, cleaning, organising, (some packing), and tidying up the block.

Needed a skip at one point, and came across an interesting concept. A skip on wheels. Was a bit cheaper than the standard- something about not needing the investment in a truck, or the cost of operating one.

No problem with permits, or damage to driveways.

20130217-094334.jpg

20130217-094352.jpg

Still managed to fill it easily- amazing how much crap accumulates!

Engineering 101 Coping Saw

Received an email today from Henry Eckert, who are the importers of Lie Nielsen Toolworks. It was promoting their new integrated site www.henryeckert.com.au.

20130216-220020.jpg

One of the items that caught my eye, was the coping saw from Knew Concepts.

Looks just like a saw that could have been designed as part of a mechanical engineering course. I’m sure I designed something like this during my degree in Mechanics of Solids!

That does not make it a bad thing- it is all about load transfer, and this allows significant blade tension while minimising weight.

20130216-220107.jpg

Add to that the material of choice is titanium, so even thinner sections are achievable while maintaining the same strength.

All this leads to being able to really tension up the blade, and as Knew Concepts claim, to achieve notes unheard of from coping saw blades. (Plucking a blade to hear the note it makes, and therefore get an idea of the blade tension is a common practice). The more tension, the greater the beam strength, so the blade is less likely to twist in the cut, allowing tighter corners and more accuracy.

Allows things such as this exceptional work by artist D.R. Halliday, entitled Masonic Coin

20130216-222214.jpg

Talk about reinventing a basic tool!

MagSwitch in the V8 Development Series

With the 2013 series of the V8 Championship about to get underway, and in a new format with multiple manufacturers finally able to participate once again, the development series is also kicking off.

On car #35 in the Dunlop (development) Series, driven by George Miedecke, MagSwitch has made a reappearance down under by becoming one of the car’s minor sponsors.

20130216-170848.jpg

20130216-170901.jpg

Their logo can be seen just behind the rear wheel.

Welcome back MagSwitch, we missed you! Time to come full circle and appear at the woodshows, and/or bring out more innovative products. We’ve liked all the ones in the past, and there is still plenty of scope for further developments for woodworking products. (Still haven’t seen my MagBroom!) I know MagSwitch is still available in Carbatec (among others), but a limited range, and I don’t think it has been actively promoted since the last time I was demo’ing it at the woodshow.

There have been some new products, mainly for industrial products. There is a larger MagJig now, and MagLatches (I got a very early version of it a few years back) are now available, just not down under.

Still want an I beam in the new shed, with a chain hoist, and I’d love to have an MLAY lifting magnet to attach. Not sure what I’d lift with it, just cool to have! Being able to swing the tablesaw around the workshop perhaps!

20130216-173332.jpg

Toy Doctor’s Kit

Had a question through social media about whether there were any examples of wooden doctor’s kits.

Found these which both looked promising examples.

20130216-141626.jpg

20130216-141648.jpg

%d bloggers like this: