A Simple Form

With both a new chuck, and a new German spindle gouge (Hamlet brand) from Carbatec, I felt inspired to try another turning.  Looking around the shed, I spied a round of Huon Pine that I bought a couple of years ago, with the intention of turning a bowl when I felt confident enough not to completely waste the timber.

Just as an aside, I like the German gouge, but the SuperNova2 is faulty – too much runout for what is meant to be a high quality tool.  Guess Teknatool shouldn’t have outsourced manufacturing to China.  (Teknatool is a New Zealand company, and the products used to be made on those green shores).  So the new chuck will be getting exchanged – hope the next one is better.  If you are curious, I tried a number of different jaw sets on this chuck, then on a G3 (using the same insert), and the difference in runout was quite noticeable.   The extra amount of problem I had in turning this bowl, with the blank trying to jump all over the place. But I still got there 😉

Mounted Huon Blank

I started in my normal way – attaching the mounting ring to the top face, then gripping it in the chuck jaws. The blank was actually too big for my lathe, so needed to cut away about 10-15mm of the diameter on the bandsaw just to get it to fit.  With the blank mounted, I only had a mm or so clearance to to tool rest when I first started turning.  I really need that bigger lathe!

Offcuts from the Size Tweak

Offcuts from the Size Tweak

Shaping the Base

Shaping the Base

The base started getting shaped, working the tool rest around the bowl to continue to have the chisel at the right angle to the bowl (there is no curved rest for this sized lathe).

Finishing the Base

Finishing the Base

The base is fully shaped, sanded and finished, with a dovetailed cavity cut to fit the jaws when the bowl is reversed.  Not sure what happened next – guess I got carried away with what I was doing – forgot to take another photo until the bowl was completed!  In the background here, you can see the Microclene air filtration unit keeping me safe from the dust.

Some Shavings

Some Shavings

There wasn’t a huge pile of shavings after this job – enough to see some work had been done!

What was, and what's inside

What was, and what's inside

The bowl is finished using the Ubeaut rotary sander, working from 80 grit through to 320, then with a combination of EEE and Shellawax cream to get a polished finish.

Resulting Polished Bowl

Resulting Polished Bowl

So my first real, traditionally shaped bowl.  The wall thickness may be a bit more than I’d like, but that comes down to experience and practice.

A Traditional Form

A Traditional Form

Although Huon Pine is reasonably plain, it still has plenty of subtle details, and this piece also had a knot to one side.  During the turning, I found the knot had started floating, so before it had a chance to dislodge completely, I stabilised it with Cyanoacrylate (SuperGlue) and accelerator.

Detail in the Timber

Detail in the Timber

Turning on a lathe is a very satisfying process, and you can typically come away with a fully finished product by the end of a session.

SuperNova2

I’ve heard it a number of times, and had no reason to specifically doubt it: that if you have a Mini lathe, you shouldn’t consider the SuperNova2 chuck. It is way too heavy for the lathe to spin properly.

Unfortunately I wanted a second chuck, and wanted to also future-proof myself (I’ve always had my eye on the Nova DVR XP lathe!), so wanted to get a chuck that would become the primary chuck for the next lathe. So I decided to risk getting the SuperNova2 now, in the hopes that although it may be too heavy for primary use, I could use it with something like the Cole Jaws at the end of the job when the majority of the blank weight had been removed.

The SuperNova2 can take the PowerJaws – something not recommended for my current G3, so grabbed those at the same time. And as is my want, I still decided to give the whole kit a go, just to see what the problem is that everyone says about the much heavier chuck on a mini lathe.

The Power Jaws!

The Power Jaws!

I’m a bit confused. Of course it may be that the Jet Mini is an exceptional lathe (well I like it), but it had no problem at all spinning up that entire collection. Your mileage may vary, but from my perspective…..COOL! It can now be my primary chuck (although I’ll be using the 45mm spigot jaws a lot more regularly than the PowerJaws!

Getting a Grip

Getting a Grip

A Heavy Bite

A Heavy Bite

The jaws of the Nova chuck system are easy to interchange, but I prefer to have a few chucks with different commonly used jaws fitted so I can change from one to the other easily, especially where multiple jaws are needed for the same job (thinking specifically of the Cole Jaws to be easily available to remove and finish the base once the primary turning is complete).

They mean business

They mean business

 

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