A New Approach to an Aussie Icon

You can tell a company’s Australian, when it brings out a product which is a reinvention of a very traditional tool – the Boomerang.  And yes, the boomerang was a tool, and not just a kid’s novelty.  It was also used for hunting, and the benefit was if you didn’t hit your target, it would generally return in the direction it was thrown.  Imagine that tech in the modern arena – fire a missile, and if it missed, it came back ready to be used for another shot!  I will also acknowledge that the boomerang is not unique to Australia, but that is enough of the history lesson!

What we have however is not designed to be thrown, but to hold, and it’s application is welding.  Being able to clamp two pieces of ferrous material at a set angle to each other, so the welder can then do the tacking up of the project.

MagSwitch Boomer Angle

MagSwitch Boomer Angle

Comes from MagSwitch, so again it is utilising the ingenious switchable magnets (in this case it is the 30mm ones), and each can be rotated through 180 degrees so you can bring the two pieces together at whatever angle is required.  I haven’t actually used it for a project as yet, so don’t have any photos of it in use, but you can get the general idea here.

A First Box

Suppose that is a little misleading – I have made boxes before, but not with an attention to the joint, nor, from memory, with the use of nice timbers and it to have cosmetic appeal as well as a function.  Who knows why – I’ve gone as far as proving the joint can be made (by me that is!), and the other specific construction areas, but hadn’t actually bought them together to create a finished object.

So this is what I have come up with.  I’ve given away the sliding lid, and instead went for a shallow rebate around the lid for a close fitted separate one.  Leaving hinges for another day, and for a box with thicker walls (at least initially).  I’d also like to try to make wooden hinges, but again – not for this box!

Mulga Box

Mulga Box

The finish is very simple, which I like – I’ve given it a sand to about 220 grit with a ROS (random orbital), then applied Ubeaut Traditional Wax.  This was then bought to the final finish with a good buff with a Ubeaut Swansdown mop, mounted in the drill press.  I haven’t used it for smaller objects before (that weren’t turning on the lathe that is), so have always had it mounted in a hand drill.  Having it mounted in a fixed tool and bringing the work to the mop was so much easier! (Of course working on large furniture which is the last thing I used it on doesn’t exactly give you that option!)

UBeaut Swansdown Mop

UBeaut Swansdown Mop

It might look dirty etc, but it needs to have a significant wax buildup in the mop before it actually becomes functional, otherwise it just sucks the wax right out of the project!

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