Catching up on Festool

Seems that a few things have come out from Festool recently that I haven’t been across.

First is a high speed oscillating tool, the Vecturo, akin to the Fein Supercut.  It also has a Festool style price tag, but also includes some interesting developments as well, depth stops and blade stabilising.  I haven’t looked into it too far as yet, particularly any side-by-side comparisons with the Fein.

down_os_vecturoos400_563000_p_01a-setdown_os_vecturoos400_563000_a__10aOne of the interesting things in the photo above, is the plate that the blade is resting against is actually magnetic, keeping the blade from vibrating perpendicularly to the cutting oscillations, helping establish a cleaner entry slot.  This also is a depth stop for the blade.  There is another depth stop for circular type blades.

down_os_vecturoos400_563000_a__11aThese can all be removed if you want a more traditional oscillating tool setup.

The next is a redesign to the ETS 150/3 and 150/5, now the ETS EC 150/3 and 150/5

down_se_ets1503a_571870_p_07b-with-systainerThe EC refers to the EC-TEC brushless motor, so it has even more power and runs quieter. At least that would be my expectation if I get to play with one.

A new version of the dust hose, that includes a plug-it cable.  I have the older version, which I find keeps things neat when both powering the tool and extracting dust at the same time.  This version also has a material shroud for extra protection of the hose.  Interested to know if this helps with tool movement, where the external spiral of the hose can catch edges occasionally.  I’m sure the shroud wouldn’t help in the situation where I did damage a hose – doubt the shroud is designed to protect against a few hundred degrees of local heat when my hose got too close to a space heater!

down_s_d2722x35asgq_500269_z_01aFinally, although this isn’t new as such, it is an interesting storage for the various tools.  I keep dropping my sander onto the floor when I catch the hose, so the sander storage would be invaluable!

ae_ucr1000p_498966_a_04a ucr-1000And a small CT17 Cleantec, which would be quite handy connected to the Torque CNC (and overall quite a portable extractor).

zoom__s_ct17e_767992_p_01a_81

There is another small driver, called the TXS, which is seemingly replacing the CXS.  There are always so many new drills and drivers I can’t keep up!

If you are looking for more info on any of the above, have a chat with Anthony over at Ideal Tools – he’s always right across the latest developments in the Festool camp.

Walko vs Festool

Been doing some handheld routing on the Festool MFT, the results of which you’ll be able to see in the next video.  I’ve been using the Festool surface clamps for much of the operation, but have been surprised to find that over time, the Walko surface clamps (which are 2/3rds the price) are actually doing a better job! (Festool $150 pair, Walko $99 pair)

fixed-clamps-mft-sp-488030

Festool Surface Clamp

 

Walko Surface Clamp

Walko Surface Clamp

(Just did an image search for both – the top 4 images of the Walko clamp all came from Stu’s Shed!)

Granted that the Festool is probably a better design, I guess, with a longer reach, the ability to secure it to the table from underneath, and I am sure there are one or two other features over the Walko.

However there is one overriding difference.  The Festool jams when you try to release it.  The Walko doesn’t.  After a while, the Festool also doesn’t slide smoothly, whereas the Walkos I have, have been going and going for years without incident.

Looking closely at the shaft of the Festool, and it is pitted along its length, dented by the securing mechanism.  Sure, I can file these off (and already have a couple of times), but it is an inherent flaw.  The metal of the shaft of the Festool surface clamp is wrong – it is too soft.  Whereas the Walko clamp has got it just right.

Not often that something is able to out-perform Festool, but in this case, something has!

Template Inlays

I first came across the concept of template inlays back when I was working on a poker table concept, back in 2009.  This was a pretty basic form – a simple shape and a contrasting piece of timber.

What I have come across recently, lifts that basic concept into the stratosphere!  It is a similar concept to the multiple templates used with the 3D router carver

Over at Tarter Woodworking, the concept of template inlays has been taken to a logical conclusion – using multiple templates (and the use of different timbers) to create stunning inlay results.

Results like this Clownfish…

clown

which happens to be one of the smaller templates, but is one of my favourites.  It is not painted on – it is multiple timbers routed and inlaid.

The templates are very reasonably priced – this clownfish template is a whole $US11.50

clownstencil

Bit of a confession however – I have a few templates here, begging to me to try them out and I haven’t (yet)!  I went to do so last weekend, then discovered a slight problem.  Having replaced my Triton handheld routers with a Festool, I didn’t have the adapter to fit the Porter Cable-style template guide rings!

That I rectified first thing Monday morning, so I am ready to go as soon as I find a couple of minutes to rub together.

Think I will probably tackle the clownfish first, but then, there is the Monarch butterfly to try.  That will take a good assortment of timbers to make the design come to life.

Monarch_full_with_stencil Monarch_Stencil_-_used MONARCH1

So looking forward to trying these out for myself – this weekend if all goes to plan (and I find my shed again under the mountain of mess and sawdust from last weekend’s rush build)!

Festool Vecturo OS400

Had to happen one day! Festool have entered the high speed oscillating tool arena with the Vecturo.

I find high speed oscillating tools exceptionally handy, but as mine have been at the budget end of the spectrum, they have developed issues (specifically around the retention bolt in each case- vibration will do that to you!)

Saw this on YouTube. Now on my “must get” list!

No idea if and when available down under- may be here already, may be 6 months away!

First footage using the Axis360

The panning slider has arrived, so have done a very quick test to see how it can work.  Smooth!  Going to be really interesting to incorporate it into the video equipment lineup.

AXIS360-1

(Video test only – no sound)

Rail Saw

I’ve been flat out recently getting the next magazine articles together (so sorry for being so quiet here – the combination of everything has been overwhelming, so I had to let some areas slip right).

One of the projects has involved making quite a bit of use of a rail saw, and in this case it was the Festool Tracksaw system, including the MFT/3 (multifunction table) that was extensively used, and as much as some are going to hate hearing it, it is bloody awesome!

This was the first time I had a chance to start putting them through their paces, and I was doing jobs on it that I would have struggled to work out another way, at least finding another way that was as easy.  The more I use it, the more it becomes apparent that it is incredibly useful in the workshop.  It doesn’t remove the need for a good tablesaw, or a SCMS, and both the SawStop and the Kapex got a heavy workout as well, but it was a real pleasure to use the right tool for each job.

hb_mft3_495315_p_01aThe MFT/3 with the rail that flips out of the way was brilliant.  Being able to drop the rail down in a consistent location meant that at one point I needed to shave off about 1/2mm, and I was able to set up for that accurately, and quickly.

ts-55-r-fs-2

If the MFT/3 was good, the TS55 running on the rail was even better.  Precision height adjustment, accurate tracking made very easy given the saw is captive on the track.

I’ll shoot some videos of these doing their thing soon – cool tools.  There are always many ways to skin a cat, some just make it so quick, easy and accurate.  When I used to look at a circular saw, I saw a rough machining tool, inaccurate, noisy and dangerous.  (My old man almost killed himself one year with a circular saw).

The Festool version is like comparing this:

Lada 2103 1300 1978 frontwith this:

00_Masterbild_1230x692_e_klasse_cabrio_NEW_1_1179_582

Both will get you from A to B.  Sort of.

Some people can’t see the point to anything more than the Lada.  Or justify the price difference (the cost of a good coffee, vs a small house!)  Although they both have 4 wheels and a motor, but that is about where the simularity ends, and the same applies to the difference between a basic Bunnings $50 circular saw, and a $1000 Festool.  The longevity of one tool over the other is just one small factor in the decision.

Suck it up

A new (and relatively cheap, at about $35) tool caught my attention at a recent Festool demonstration, which I mentioned briefly at the time.  It is the Festool Dust Removal Nozzle, and it just goes to show that sometimes the best ideas are so simple, you ask yourself “why didn’t I think of that”. It isn’t the first time that a vacuum based system or similar concept has been used, but it certainly is a good example of one!

bs__d27bsd_500483_z_01a_derivat_jpg_300dpi

Drilling can be a messy business, especially when inside the house and the room where you need to do the work is perfectly clean otherwise, (well, again, relatively speaking!)  I’ve had this situation a number of times, and often in the kitchen when you want to install something above the kitchen bench.  You drill a hole, and the plasterboard produces that talc-fine dust that falls down from the hole you are drilling and lightly coats the bench surface.  You spend more time trying to wipe up that damned powder than the time it took to drill the hole!  That includes those plaster wall anchors that you either drill a hole for, or those that drill and self tap a hole.

I’ve seen many examples over the years of how people have tried to solve the problem simply and cheaply, even resorting to post-it notes

img_8815

The Festool solution is a dual chamber system, which allows the dust collector to adhere to the surface (rough or smooth), as well as collect dust that is produced.

00504066_perforateur_bhc18li_festool_g4_1

It isn’t a drill guide per-say (although I know Dennis is working on a mod for his one that does just that!), but it sucks onto the surface, and collects the dust right at the point that it is being produced, which is the best place to do so, especially rather than trying to wipe off the residue from the clean kitchen bench below!

As mentioned, overhead isn’t a problem, nor is rough surfaces, such as concrete, even when both ‘challenging’ scenarios occur simultaneously

19431So there you have it – a cool tool, Festool, and yet you don’t need to break the bank to have one!  And just think of all the times you’ve had to clean up after drilling into plasterboard.  Use post-it notes for writing reminders (or your next art work)

post-it-notesFor keeping drilling dust under control, there is a better solution!

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