Laguna Nation

My eye was initially caught walking past the Laguna stand by a familiar colour, but an interesting looking jig

Laguna-1Grr-ripper colours (and with Grr-rippers attached), but is actually a taper ripping jig, heavily engineered.

Has stops for repeatable setup, positive setting positions, and locations for connecting one, and two Grr-rippers.

From there, I had a closer look around the stand (having just signed up for “citizenship” of LagunaNation – with the passport coming in the post shortly – interesting marketing campaign).

Laguna-6

Not the best photo, but they had just finished resawing some Huon pine into a 2mm veneer.  Their triple variable skip carbide toothed bandsaw blades are quite impressive! They also have Forrest blades (at least the dado, not sure about the Woodworker2) – for a long time Forrest was not interested in the Australian market – glad someone was able to change their minds.

Laguna-2

At first glance, the drum sander (Swiss-tec) is similar to the Carbatec one, but then the stand is enclosed, there is an extra control box which varies the drum speed, and not the the feed belt speed, and the drums a (relatively) easy to exchange, so you can go from the traditional wrapped sandpaper drum to a flap sander (with brushes backing up the flaps so they last longer), or a silicon-carbide brush drum.

Laguna-3 Laguna-5

 

Their CNC machine (Laguna) looks a good build, with water-cooled motor, and a decent bed size. Having some experience now of a CNC lathe, these are a lot more interesting now than just watching robot woodworking!

Laguna-4 Other than a closeup of that bandsaw blade I was mentioning, these are the guides on one of the bandsaws (one side removed).  Twin ceramic rectangular plates push in the side of the blade, and a circular ceramic disk behind as the thrust surface.

Very nice guide system, and the ceramic would run cool.  It would also be a lot quieter.

Sinking Deeper

Once the initial parts for the sink were glued up (the large U shape sections), it was time to make the actual components.  Ideally, I wouldn’t have had to take the previous step, but I am working with a limited stock size, partly as a bit of an exercise, partly because I have the timber, and don’t feel like buying something else.  The redgum is being salvaged from the ugliest, oldest sleeper you would have seen in a long time.  Always surprising just how much good timber is hidden behind a rough façade.

sink-10

Creating the sink template

To cut the individual sections out, I created a template from MDF.  It is easy to draw up and shape to the required profile.

sink-9

Template attached

In this case, I didn’t have to worry about screw holes, so it was easier and less problematic to use screws (Kreg square drive).  You may wonder about the amount of timber wasted here inside the sink.  It won’t be going to waste, as I intend to use this again in the same way to produce some other (as yet undecided) kitchen appliances.

sink-8

Bandsawing around the template

To remove the bulk of the material, the bandsaw works exceptionally well.  Cutting near to the template reduces the load on the pattern copying router bit.

sink-7

Routing to shape

Over to the router table, and with a pattern bit (a straight cutter with a bearing on top), each piece of the sink is routed to shape.  (The photo above has the piece upside down)

sink-4

Glued and clamped

Next, each piece is glued and clamped together to form the body of the sink.  The ends have also been cut using the same template, but obviously only the outside is cut and routed.

sink-3

Spindle Sanding

The spindle sander is next, and is the perfect tool for this job.  It may not get the full depth, but flipping the workpiece over a few times keeps things pretty even.

sink-2

Fine sanding

The size of the sink just allowed me to get the ETS150 inside, but it isn’t ideal for sanding around corners…..except I have a soft sanding pad (from Ideal Tools).  This has hooks on one side, and loops on the other, so it acts as a spacer between the original sanding pad and the sandpaper.  With this, it is really easy to sand all sorts of concave and convex profiles.

sink-1

Soft sanding pad

This is the soft sanding pad – a very useful addition for the ROS.

***Update: it is called an interface pad, and can be found here

sink-5

Attaching the sides

With the inside done, the sides of the sink can be attached.  This (and the next image) were actually photographed before the glueup, but it gives you the idea.

sink-6

Laminated sink

So that is how I make the laminated sink, still ensuring that the entire project can be made from timber.  Not sure if I will be able to maintain that ideal for the entire project, but I am still working towards it.  Very pleased I used contrasting timber this time – might as well make a feature of the laminations!

Jet-tember!

If you are interested in Jet tools, there is a sale on right now for the month of Jet-tember that you will not want to miss.

Gregory Machinery (who were the previous importers of Jet Tools) appear to be selling off all their remaining stock given that CarbaTec are about to become the new importers/distributors of Jet Tools.  Not sure if the sale will be extended to other resellers of Jet (other members of the Woodman Group).

Jet-tember

Jet-tember

It is quite an extensive catalogue of Jet machines and parts on offer, from tablesaws, bandsaws through to clamps, fences, sanders and so forth.

JTS-600

JWBS-20Q

JJ-6CSDX

This isn’t your every day run-of-the mill sale.  There are some serious (and some seriously awesome) machines and tools on offer here, at excellent prices.

This includes 20% off one of my favourite bandsaws (the JWBS-14CS), 20% off the longbed 6″ jointer I use, etc etc.  Discounts range from nothing to over 60%, with the vast majority between 20% and 30% off.

The full catalogue, including pricing and the discount is here (in PDF)  JET_tember_Pricelist

Goodnight, Sleep Tight

It took pretty much two months to the day to build the cot, given that we were snatching half a day here, half a day there.

Friday evening was the final push, and we just kept at it until all the final issues were solved (making the side rise and fall, how to assemble it, etc etc).  Took us through to about 12:30 at night, but we got it done.  It isn’t sanded and oiled as yet (that’s a job for the expectant father!) and the final bit of time he has before his world becomes somewhat busier!  Looking back at the earliest posts, and we were a bit naive in our predictions on just how long/how many sessions it would take.  Just Friday night was a bit of a marathon – not that it wasn’t a good time, just that tasks always take longer than planned!  3 sessions?  More like 5 or 6 (really lost track!)

But first I’ll back up a bit, for a quick summary / overview, and then with more detail from the assembly of the ends.  As mentioned earlier, the focus was very much on the planning and construction of the cot, rather than documenting the process.

Session one was getting the bed itself made – the surround and base for the mattress.  Everything in the project was made from Tasmanian Oak, and machined down (and out of) large slabs such as seen here:

Tassie Oak Slabs

It was glued up in a later session (clamped up with Frontline clamps), with a rail under the bed supporting the MDF bed base.  This was also drilled with a series of large holes for ventilation.

Bed section clamped up

Session two involved making the slats (and some testing to get the distances between slats right, so it was even over the cot length.  Again, the actual glueup happened in a later session.

Making the slats

All the rail components

We also resawed, dressed and glued up the pine end panels in this session.

End panels

A month then passed while we both had other distractions.

Session three commenced with a glueup of the various sections.  The bed (as seen above), and the rails.

Rails glued up

Each end panel had the 3D routing done, and the rails for the cot ends made.

Session four was time for the legs to be made.  These were each notched so the bed rested firmly on them, transferring the load directly down the legs rather than through a mechanical joint.  A T Track was routed into the two front legs, using a slot-cutting router bit.

By the end of the day (including some extra work done afterwards), the ends were done.  This is where we pick up the story.

After producing the inserts for the ends (10mm thick pine boards, joined to produce a full panel), routing the 3D pattern into each end, it was time to cut them to their final dimension.  The question is, how to use the tablesaw to cut boards with uneven ends.

There are a whole host of methods promoted, sleds that clamp down on the piece, extension tables either built into the tablesaw (or added on, such as the Triton Extension Table) etc.  Actually, speaking of which, the Triton extension table would have been great for this project, if I had somewhere to actually put it!  This project really demonstrated how tight the shed has become. Assembly, and even moving around the larger components was a real problem.  Could really do with another shed, either to spread the overall load, or to use more as a project area / workbench area rather than the actual timber shaping/component construction.

Back to cutting the panel.  The solution I used was to attach a temporary straight-edge to the board, and it ran along the tablesaw fence, so the opposite side could be cut parallel.

Using a straight edge

In this case it was simply a piece of MDF and a couple of screws into what would become waste.  FWIW, I hadn’t set up the saw at this point, changing the blade to a crosscut blade and then replacing the splitter and guard.

The top and bottom rails were dominoed onto these boards (biscuits could have been used), glued and clamped, then the whole assembly glued and clamped to the legs to form the cot ends.  This was done over a number of days (availability of clamps, and time), ready for the final session.

Assembling the panels

Cot ends

(Yes, I know you have just seen this image – as mentioned, I was concentrating a lot more on the build than on documenting the process! Sorry :) )

Session five – our late night marathon to finish.

A bed takes shape!

There was a lot of bolting and unbolting of the ends as we finished off the various components and steps, and the beauty of the cot is it can be flat-packed when no longer needed.  Just with the ends bolted on, the rigidity was obvious.  An extra stringer between the ends would be ideal, but with a combination of bolts and the corners being recessed into the legs is enough.

The back rail was added, again bolted to the bed itself, and with dominos into the legs.  These were left unglued – more than enough strength left just like that.  In time if it proved necessary, a small hole and a piece of dowel inserted through the leg and the domino as a pin would lock them together.

The final job was getting the front rail so it was functional.

At first it was pretty tight – a roof screw running up and down the track.  With quite of bit of trial and error, sanding the track a bit, adding some plastic tube to cover up the exposed screw threads, adjusting the height of the screws so they run cleanly in the track, and finally lubricating the track with Ubeaut Traditional Wax.  Whatever it was (and more likely a combination of them all), it went from being a bit average, to running as well as any commercial solution.  With spring-loaded catches at the top edge that automatically engage when the rail is lifted, the cot was finished (at least as far as my involvement).  Still needs a bit of sanding and oiling, but other than that, a really successful, enjoyable build.

Finished!

Side dropped to lower position

The final view

So the cot was done – getting it out of the shed was a mission – we took it out assembled, and it was a rather tight fit (leveraging it around the bandsaw).

Getting it into the covered trailer was also interesting.  Another 5mm in leg length (perhaps even less), and it would not have fitted.  Also in length – it was like absolutely built with the trailer dimensions in mind!

So that’s it – another successful project conclusion.  There is always that air of relief, satisfaction, remorse, disbelief when a project is over.  Fortunately, there is always more timber out there, and so many more projects to build!

Speechless

Well we all know THAT is an exaggeration! However.

Finally had a chance (and the justification) to fit my new 1″ 1.3TPI, TCT resaw blade on the bandsaw today.

Before I get into what I think of the blade, (and as far as bandsaw blades go, it wasn’t particularly cheap), I’ll mention what prompted me to splurge on a replacement blade.

I was trying to resaw some kiln dried hardwood (Tassie Oak), that was around 200mm wide.  I was using a 1″ 1.3TPI blade that came prepackaged from a woodwork supplier.  Not sure if it was a carbon blade, but I strongly suspect so.  I was struggling.  The blade was complaining bitterly, the amount of force needed to push the timber through the blade was getting stupid  (the range of force needed is “butter”, “easy”, “moderate”, “hard”, “difficult”, “impossible”, “dangerous”, “stupid”), and I was blowing the circuit breaker on the bandsaw circuit continuously (it isn’t rated particularly high, so trips way to easily).  To the point that I was oping for the 15A tablesaw to do the resawing, taking a couple of passes to cleave the timber.

So onto today.  More resawing required.  Fitted the TCT blade with a bit of trepidation – what if it isn’t much better?

The blade fitted, tensioned, and finally the timber ready to cut.  I touched the end to the blade (to make a mark to ensure I was centred).  Well I meant to touch the end.  Being so used to the previous blade, I put a little bit of pressure in, and immediately sliced into the timber over 5mm.  Whoa.

Checked I was centred, then fed the timber in, through, and out the other side (1800mm) cleaved in twain without beginning to try.  I need a new category for ease – “Soft butter”  And this was hardwood.  Be very interesting the day I need to resaw some serious Aussie hardwood.  Do not expect this blade to have any trouble – wonder how easy it will be!

It goes to show, the right blade, a quality blade makes it so much easier, safer, enjoyable.  So the blade was $180 or so. After experiencing what it could do, it is worth every cent.  Just a pity I can’t get blades thinner than 1″ with a TCT.  Not that the bimetal 1/2″ blade has been any slouch either.

As mentioned earlier, purchased from Henry Bros Saws if you want your bandsaw to become everything it can be!  Sounds like a sales pitch (perhaps it should be!) but no.

Real Smooth Shave

Gave the first new bandsaw blade a quick workout today – the 1/2″ 3TPI bimetal blade.

It has a regular tooth set, and slices beautifully.  When resawing, it vastly out-performed my current 1″ carbon resaw blade – it is obviously significantly sharper – not surprising given how easily carbon blades dull off.

So not only it is superbly sharp, because it is bimetal it will hold that edge for longer.  I guess I have found my new “standard” blade – the one that will stay on the bandsaw by default, so whenever I want to do a quick cut without going to the trouble of changing blades, this is the one that is a jack of all trades. So yes, very happy with this first blade, and looking forward to testing the others.

The general rule is to have as few teeth in the cut as possible.  Too many, and the gullets fill and clog and the blade cannot cut well.  Too few teeth, and the cut is rougher than is necessary.  Having a range of blades, sizes, tooth configurations, tooth numbers will mean you will have the best blade for the job.

Straight-faced tooth with deep gullet to remove shavings.

Deep gullet and 10o undercut face which digs in more, and tends to curl the shavings.  Good for harder woods.  I would imagine though, that it is likely to dull off quicker, given there is less material backing the tooth edge up.

Similar to Hook Tooth, but has the teeth at 90o . Chips rather than shaves – good for materials that would otherwise clog up the blade.  Effectively increases the gullet (which clears the formed chips out of the cut), without having to increase the overall tooth size.

Has a combination of teeth closer together for a finer finish, with some teeth having large gullets for chip clearance.

Bandsaw Blades

Just ordered some new bandsaw blades for my 17″ machine.  Done, as always, over the phone.  Bandsaw blades are one of those things you get made to order, not precut and packaged, sitting on a shelf.  I’d rather have a relationship with the supplier, rely on their expertise, and know they are surviving on their reputation, which means they are only as good as the last blade they sell you, so they better sell you a good one!

Blades come in massive continuous rolls, which are then cut to length and welded.

This latest order comes from my original supplier, Henry Bros in NSW, so I am expecting good things. (And no, I don’t get a discount).

I’ve ordered a 3/16″ carbon blade, a 1/2″ bimetal, and my very first 1″ carbide tipped resaw blade.  I’m rather excited to see what that blade can do!

The point about a CT blade is not that they are the sharpest tool in the shed (no, I don’t mean they are dumb!), but they have excellent durability of the cutting surface.  The resaw blade I have at the moment (which came with the saw as part of a deal) is a very basic blade, and from what I can tell is a straight carbon blade.  Which for a blade needing to survive thick, Aussie hard timbers is basically useless after a few short jobs.

A CT blade is meant to be screamingly expensive, and when I priced one for my 14″ Jet bandsaw (which has a 6″ riser block), it was quite a price that I decided not to bother.  Around $80/metre (plus GST) (and I needed 2680mm), it was over $200.  The equivalent bimetal blade cost me about $40 at the time (1.3 TPI). The 14″ Jet can take a maximum 3/4″ blade, and as it turns out, this really pushed the cost up.

This time I decided that it would be really good to get a CT blade for resawing, so steeling myself against price tag shock, I asked how much it would cost for my 3335mm length blade (which is what I need for the 17″).  $38/metre (plus GST) for a 1″ blade.  Means I am up for around $150 inc GST!  Oh yeah, bring on the carbide tips!

Just a bit on blade material, fwiw

A cheap blade is generally a carbon blade.  Carbon steel in other words.  Cheap, initially sharp, but unable to hold an edge for long.  I don’t but carbon blades for anything but the smallest blades (scrollsaw type work), such as 1/8″, 3/16″, 1/4″ (if I have to).  Anything larger than that, don’t waste your money.

As soon as I can I move into bimetal blades.  These are as they sound -  a blade made from two different metals.  The base metal is a carbon blade (spring steel), but where a carbon blade’s shortcomings are the teeth durability, there is a different metal welded to the front of the blade which the teeth are cut out of.  This is often a cobalt high speed steel, so much more suitable for teeth.

And finally, TCT blades.  Not as sharp initially as the others, but significantly longer lasting, so overall they are sharper on average over the life of the blade.  In the case of the 1″ blade, it has cost me about 3x as much as a standard blade.  A worthwhile investment to my mind.

So when the package arrives (it’ll take a couple of days for the blades to be made and shipped), I will be very interested to see how they all perform.  I pity the timber!

A sight for saw eyes: Bandsaw vs Pickup Truck

After my article on bandsaws tonight, Greg mentioned www.hemsaw.com, and a stunt they pulled with one of their bandsaws.

I had a quick check on YouTube and found the video:

I skipped some of the 9 min video to see the end, but check out the bandsaw!! The size of the wheels, speed of rotation etc. Awesome!

Cheers Greg- definitely worth viewing :)

Taking an Inch

Ever wondered why there are so many bandsaw sizes in the world, and just why you’d choose one over another?

If you head into a box warehouse and see a bandsaw, it is probably an 8″ model.  But there are sizes above that.  If there is a second size in the store, it is probably a 12″.  If you head over to a dedicated machinery store, then you can see 14″, 17″, right up to 21″ and 24″

Sourced from Wikipedia

Contrary to a common misconception, the size of the bandsaw does not equate to the achievable depth of cut, nor even to the depth of the throat (although that is also a very common opinion).  The second is pretty close to the money even so.  What it equates to is the size (diameter) of the upper and lower wheels.  This has a direct correlation to the maximum depth of throat (and thus where that popular interpretation comes from), and nothing to do with the depth of cut (resaw capacity).

Realistically, the depth of throat has some bearing on the decision between one saw and another, but I rarely find it too small, be that on my 14″ cast iron Jet, or my box-section 17″ machine.  (Even so, I’d love larger!)  The big reason is the overall capacity and power of the machine.

Not power as in motor size, but the ability to physically tension the blade, and the maximum width of blade the machine can cope with.  The larger the machine, generally the larger the blade it can comfortably handle.

The other advantage comes down to what you are expecting said blade to do. Run very straight, with as little bend or flex, then bend around a 180 degree turn, run straight, another 180 degree turn, repeat ad infinitum. Bend and straight, bend and straight.  Sounds like a perfect recipe for fatigue.  By having larger wheels, this issue is reduced.

A smaller bandsaw may be all you can fit, or afford and if that suits your purpose, no problem.  But if you have an option, try to justify upsizing.  Some other features to look out for include the type of guides (bearing vs rub block), quick tension release, dust collection, location of the blade tension wheel.  My 17″ also has variable speed (multiple pulleys), but I have never seen a need to change the operating speed.

I’d love to have both the bandsaws in my workshop – the 17″ set up for resawing, the 14″ for fine work.  However, there just isn’t that much space, so I have to stick with one, and change blades often.

When Worlds Collide

Source: NASA/JPL-Caltech

Really, nothing so spectacular actually.

One of my staff is having a baby soon, so came around to ‘the shed’ so we could start working on a cot.  He’s chosen Tasmanian Oak, so bought some lengths, around 170 wide and 45 thick. (mm that is).

We were too busy to stop for photos, sorry about that!

First job was resawing, so I tried the bandsaw, but had a few problems there.  For one, I think my resaw blade needs sharpening – it really struggled.  I know hardwood is, well, hard but this isn’t the worst thing I have been able to put through this blade.

Combined with the blade dullness, is the increase of load that creates on the bandsaw and therefore an increase in power that is drawn.  Problem number 2 then cropped up – kept tripping the circuit breaker.  Now I know that isn’t related to any fault in the tool, just a underrated circuit breaker that trips at 10A (and probably less), without any threshold.  We ended up giving it away, and swapped over to the tablesaw, with the blade at full height, and two passes to split the board.  Even with two passes (flipping the board over) wouldn’t be sufficient to cut that entire width, but all we needed was actually 145mm, so ripped the board down before splitting.  Even the 15A tablesaw was pushed with such a full-depth cut, and even when changed over to a ripping blade, so perhaps the timber was as hard as the machines were saying.

So we properly dressed the timber all round (using the combination of the jointer (planer), thicknesser and tablesaw).  This obviously isn’t your garden variety DAR – the boards are left flat and true, without warp, twist or bend.

After docking the boards to their required length, it was over to the router table, where a 6mm groove was cut near the bottom in each side, so when assembled it can have a captive base.  By the end of the session, we had made the bed section itself (that has the mattress filling the area, with a maximum of 5mm between the mattress and the sides.  The standard allows for double that).

Once all machined, and edges rounded over with the Fastcap 1/8″ roundover plane, it was onto the Domino to make slots for floating tenons.

We ran out of time to sand and finish – job for another day.

This was part 1 of about a 3 part project. Good using the tools for a bit of furniture again.

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 1,571 other followers

%d bloggers like this: