10 Tips for CNC Router Aluminum Cutting Success – CNCCookbook CNCCookbook

10 Tips for CNC Router Aluminum Cutting Success – CNCCookbook CNCCookbook.

Thanks for the link John – a really useful reference for machining aluminium.

The G-Wizard is probably a useful calculator, but is quite a bit for a sub (of course, broken tools cost more very quickly).  Have to think about that one.  If I was a commercial operation, it would be an easy decision!

Another missed birthday!

Birthday-Cake-by-Omer-Wazir1

Somehow, managed to miss (once again) the stusshed.com birthday.

Now 8 years old, and counting.

2.5 million views (directly, not counting subscriber views) at a rate of over 1000/day (around 385000/yr, plus subs).
over 2200 subscribers (counting RSS)

I can’t even begin to estimate how many video views etc any more – I could if I wanted to spend an hour or so collating the info, but it is a lot!  One video has already amassed over 75000 views.  Not much in the scheme of viral videos, but not bad for a lowly woodworking one.  Over 450000 views of the videos on YouTube alone, and that is only a portion of the total video library. Safe to say, the total views of videos (through iTunes, the blog, Blip.TV (now ended), Howcast (also ended), and YouTube) easily exceeds 1/2 a million (and that is conservative).

Oh well.  Happy 8th birthday blog.

Melbourne Wood Show is moving (again)

Looks like the Timber and Working with Wood Show is moving again, not only to a new home, but a new date.

It is now on in September, 11th to the 13th at the Caulfield Racetrack.   Door prices are still $16, but there is free parking.  Doesn’t clash with the AFL Grand Final, which is in October this year, and it finally manages to avoid the MotoGP at Phillip Island, which was normally the same weekend.

Of course, it does make it the same weekend as the Sandown 500, which is, to my mind, a similar demographic – perhaps with some age separation?  For some of us, that makes it a real choice: the one V8 Supercars race that is held locally in the year, or the annual wood show?  With an attendance in the vicinity of 200,000 over the weekend at the Sandown 500, that won’t impact too badly on Working with Wood Show numbers would it?

20131208_144603_1_Jamie_Whincup

VS

woodshowday1-8

Decisions, decisions.

A guard for your hands and eyes

Incra are well known for their significant contributions to woodworking, particularly at the highly engineered end of the spectrum, with their precision tools (such as accurate fence positioning).

So when they bring out a new tool, it is worth taking note, so I was interested when Incra released a push block to see just what they have bought to the party.

rta_pushguard_main_zoomSold in Australia by Professional Woodworkers Supplies

The first thing that you notice is the clear shield.  It can be easily removed when the job doesn’t need it (or moreso, if it would be in the way), but for jobs that result in the cutter being exposed in particular, having added protection to prevent wayward wood chips flying in the direction of your eyes is a neat addition.

rta_pushguard_detail1_zoomThe handle is a decent size, not only so you can (just) fit two hands, but also so you can get a good positive grip on it, to control the workpiece.

Speaking of controlling the workpiece, and that is where the 178x75mm working surface comes into play, providing a decent contact area.  Often, you would want to work with two of these guards, not only further increasing the working area, but so you can further control the orientation of the workpiece relative to the tool, and prevent it twisting out from under the pushblock.

Unlike most pushblocks, the Incra one also has a double-walled ABS hand guard (grey) further protecting your rather valuable tools (hands).

rta_pushguard_detail3_zoom

I’d see a definite use for these on the router table, and the jointer particularly.  In an ideal world, I’d have 4 of these, two with the clear guard attached, and two without to cover all the jobs I’d want to use these on, without having to remove and replace the clear guard, but they are pretty easy to remove and replace even so.

Safety equipment is always something that comes secondary to the tools that allow us more capability in the workshop, but as I was told years ago when I got my motorbike license, if you can’t afford the safety equipment, you can’t afford the bike, and the same thing applies to woodworking.

Joint forming blade

CNC Sunday

I had an idea that perhaps I should consider limiting my posts about working with the CNC to one day a week.  But I doubt that is a resolution I’ll stick to for longer than 5 minutes!

I spent the day carving out a bunch of nested designs from MakeCNC.com, on their Australian Animal series.  I’ve put together one so far (a Bilby), and have cut out the cockatoo, kangaroo, croc, frilled neck lizard, and a bunch of others- about 6 to go of the 16 in total.  I’ll post more about them (including pics) when I have them together in the zoo.

In the meantime, I finished the spitfire for my daughter’s school.  This was also cut out of 12mm MDF (as was the pteradactyl), and has a wing span of about 1.4m

spitfire-1 spitfire-2 spitfire-3 spitfire-4

The last is shot with a bottle, to give a bit of a sense of scale.  Solid thing!  I engraved the wings before they were cut out using a v bit.  Rather cool all told (found here)- almost tempted to make another to the same size to hang in the shed (and have it painted up).

Speaking of painting things up, that is what my daughter decided to do today.  So with a bunch of acrylic paints, she first undercoated, then painted a couple of the models I made for her yesterday.  The came up really well!  Really adds an extra dimension to the models.

spitfire-5Fun day, lots of sawdust! (After all, that is what it is all about).

 

At blinding speed

The first half of this video is in rastor mode.

The second half in vector mode, operating at a mind blowing 6 metres/sec!

Amazing!!!

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