Video Edit

Currently in the process of editing the latest video, which is about all the different materials that can be routed on the Torque CNC, with the Toolstoday Master Collection of router bits.

Currently have 2 hours of video, shot on 6 devices simultaneously.  And about another 1 – 2 hours of recording to go.  By the time I’m finished, I will have had to edit 24 hours of raw footage into the final video.  No wonder it is taking some time!!

And for a completely random bit of information, the Stu’s Shed twitter feed has just passed 1000 followers.  Not a lot in the scheme of things, but still a cool waypoint from my perspective.

Tien Lung Dragon

Dragon_gradient

Plans available from MakeCNC.com

Corian

Been looking at a few different materials as part of this exercise on routing (CNC) a range of alternate materials and surfaces.  Had a closer look at Corian today, and while I was generally aware of the term, and the look/feel of kitchen benches made of the stuff, I didn’t actually know much more about it.  While this is unlikely to be news to everyone, a bit more information about what this product is may be quite interesting.  Not sure how I missed knowing more about it until now, but there you have it – can’t know everything!

Turns out it is around 50-50 polymethyl methacrylate with aluminum trihydroxide filler.  To put that in more common terms, it is around 50% acrylic polymer, and 50% alumina trihydrate, which is a product derived from bauxite.  Bauxite, as you may well know, is the raw material that is processed into aluminium.

Makes a lot more sense to me now why some people have been using it to make pens on the lathe!  Probably makes a bloody good pen if the truth be known, look, feel, finish and weight.

While it can be thermoformed into various shapes, it can also be machined relatively easily as well.  So I will be rather interested to see how it goes on the CNC, both in shaping, even 3D work, and engraving.  A number of router bits in my CNC collection are rated to handle solid surface materials, including the 3D cutters.  Think it will look rather interesting, and opens the door to combining it as another material in a mixed material project.  Especially given its machinability.

Multiple Materials

I’ve been trying out some different materials on the CNC, using some of the other router bits in the Toolstoday.com Master Collection.

Using the 51411 “Spiral ‘O’ Flute” upcutting plastic cutting solid carbide bit, I tried a bit of polycarbonate.  This is 3mm thick, which ideally suits the plans I currently have.  I started with some clear, to try it out as much as anything.  I slowed the feed rate down (given I am currently restricted to 12000RPM), then slowed it down further.  I found it ran pretty smoothly at 10mm/sec.  I plunged at the same speed, but for future reference, ramping the bit down should be a better approach.  With a 1.5mm depth of cut, things worked pretty well.

dragon-1My next endeavour will be to approach the same model again, but choose different materials for the different components.  So far I have about 4 different polycarbonate colours (one being fluoro), some aluminium and brass in the design.  Hopefully it will all work together and not look too mismatched.

Clear red poly for the flames, aluminium for the nostril smoke, and for the centreline of the body (up to and including the tail), brass for the small plates on the underbelly (like Smaug and his gold-encrusted hide), and a combination of solid green poly and fluoro green poly (for the scales, and head).

Veritas Custom Plane

The Far Side of the World

kara rasmanis

An awesome photo of the Clipper, taken by a friend of mine – Kara Rasmanis.  It is using a real map as the background (not photoshopped).  The flag on the back is one my daughter was inspired to make when she saw the ship being assembled.

Clipper

Know it is getting a little repetitive, but I couldn’t resist making just one more of these.  Sure I’ll make more, but you don’t need to see them all (unless you want to!)

This was a pretty easy one to cut out, but I found the design had left out a number of hull sections, so that was a bit of a problem, and the assembly directions were ordinary as well, so a number of parts got broken and needed replacing as I worked out a new assembly order.

However, neither of those took as long as tying the sails into position!!

ship-1 ship-2

Cut out with a 1/16″ solid carbide straight cutter router bit (Toolstoday.com), running at 50mm/sec, and at 12000 RPM (I’d run it much faster, but I don’t have spindle speed control at the moment)

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