Swiss Cheese

Slowly perfecting my processes, in this case for what is called a profile cut, where the object’s outer border is defined and the CNC router cuts the shape out.

I’ve been using a 1/8″ upcut solid carbide router bit – the 46100 from Toolstoday.com for the job so far, but knowing that it is not the correct router bit for the job.  What I should be using is something like the 46184 1/8″ solid carbide compression bit, or the 46180. (46237 and 46227 are also interesting bits, being 1/16″ diameter, which would be needed if doing nested work in 3mm MDF.)

Few reasons.

1. An upcut bit produces a lot of tearout in MDF.  While I can easily fix this with a quick sand of the top surface before removing the sheet, it would be preferable to avoid that step.

2. The upcut bit, especially at speed and with a large depth of cut, tries to lift the material being cut.  MDF is not a stiff structure, especially in a nesting situation which really turns the board to Swiss cheese.  It becomes almost impossible to stop the board being lifted, so I had to increase the number of passes from 2 to 5, and even then had a few lifting problems.

Not a fault of the router bit, I’m just using it as I don’t have another one of that diameter (or smaller) to work with 6mm thick boards in a nested layout, especially where I need grooves cut in the workpiece that are 5.9mm wide so they can slot together.

I’m cutting at 80mm/sec, and with about a 2mm depth of cut (DOC).  I know the CNC machine and the router bit can easily handle a lot more DOC, but my holddowns cannot keep up.  If I had a vacuum table, or even used a fair amount of double sided tape, that would be much less of an issue.

To stop the individual pieces being cut loose and walking into the cutter, wrecking them, I added tabs to each piece generally 2-3 per piece, 4mm wide and 1mm deep.  These are easily cut and sanded away at the end of the job.

It is important to ensure the cut goes all the way through in that final pass.  I have been using 0.5mm, but am thinking 1mm would work better.  Certainly, that means the router bit is cutting all the way through and partially out the other side, but that is why the tabletop has a sacrificial layer added.

What I made this time is the tropical fish (Angel Fish)……..

CNC-1 CNC-2 CNC-3and a stegosaurus!

CNC-4 CNC-5

It is very addictive!

And just for a sense of scale, here are both projects photographed alongside a bottle of wine (not so easy to see sorry!)

CNC-6

Now I just have 148 designs to go!

Plans from MakeCNC

Tambour Sun Lounge

Managed to finish off the Tambour Sun Lounge this evening – went together surprisingly quickly in the end.

It is made up of 137 individual, interlocked tambour slats, produced using the Lonnie Bird Tambour Router Bit Set from Toolstoday.com.  I made quite a few more than I needed, as I wasn’t sure how many I’d break testing the load limits, or, when I started the project, just how long a tambour I’d end up requiring.  The slats I have left over can be turned into a small drinks table, and/or a lumbar support.

I’ve now made over 300 tambour slats with this set, and it is still going strong.  This project uses approx 90 meters of slats, so if you work that out – 2 passes with one of the router bits, and one with the other, that is 270m of routing, and about the same distance again on the tablesaw, not to mention multiple passes on the jointer and thicknesser.  All in one day – over a km of timber passed through one machine or another.  I slept well that night!

I made the slats about as thick as I could manage, and still be able to slot them together.  Granted, it would be possible to go even thicker if you were prepared to make the slot on the bottom of the slat wider.  However, I tested this tambour by standing on it, on one foot.  That it survived that torture test (just) demonstrates just how strong they are (and the timber obviously).

So that’s it – job done.  The full step by step writeup will be in the next edition of “The Shed” magazine.  If you haven’t seen it yet (available in Australia and NZ, and I imagine digitally elsewhere), it is worth checking out.

 

What I’m Working On

A couple of years ago, when I first made a tambour door using the router bits from Toolstoday.com, I thought (and mentioned) at the time that it could make an interesting chair of sorts.  I had in mind a sun chair.

So that is what I have been making over the last few days, (and the full article when finished will appear in the next edition of The Shed magazine).

Started with a design concept in my head, that sketched out looked like this:

DSC04507

 

Made a stack of tambour door slats (over 175 in total)

DSC04491

and when all joined together, created a tambour roll, ready to be rolled out over a supporting frame.

DSC04494

Took a full day to make enough slats, and it isn’t much to show for from the original pile of timber.  However, other than a bag of sawdust there was little other wastage.

In a few days I should have the supporting frame finished, then we can all see if it will work how I picture it in my head!  Seems I prefer building things without a plan, or at least without someone else’s plan.  Presents more challenges and puzzles to solve.

I did lay the tambour bed out over an existing sun chair, and it looked good, and was very comfortable (at least as comfortable as it can be without padding!)

I also laid them out on the tablesaw, following the curves I am intending to see how it will look.  Bit hard to see from that camera angle, but it should be good.

DSC04504

Looking forward to seeing the resulting item.

 

Photographic Improvements

Been having some down time over the Christmas break, both of the deliberate, and of the forced varieties. (Got rather sick after finishing work-guess the body decided I could afford to succumb once the stress of work appeared to have eased up. Stupid body!)

Other than a bit of mental space, family time, and time to knock over a couple of Lego builds, I’ve also been familiarising myself with a new camera.

2014 has seen a significant improvement in my setup for audio, video and stills.

I’ve added a Canon HFG30 video camera to the lineup, some Rode mics, a motorised slider for timelapse, and most recently (thanks Santa!) a new camera body and lens.

While photos for the blog don’t require the most sophisticated cameras (screen resolution is still very low for web-based images), I have a regular gig for a couple of magazines as well, and they do need decent res images. Not to mention that I have been resorting to using the iPhone for a number of blog images, and while pretty amazing for a camera based around a phone, it is still a very small lens, and tiny chip!

I had a very long debate about what route to go with the camera. I have been using Minolta for almost 30 years (although that sadly became Konica-Minolta, and the Sony in the last 10 or so), so have a lot of lenses, etc for that mount. It was very tempting to bite the bullet and head down the Canon or Nikon routes, but a combination of nostalgia, still having a lot of Minolta glass (and flash), and some really interesting points of difference between Sony and the other brands finally kept me with the same mount.

My first (semi-serious) camera (not counting an Exacta that I still have, which was the very first brand of 35mm SLR)

/home/wpcom/public_html/wp-content/blogs.dir/083/1272551/files/2014/12/img_2695.jpg

was a Minolta 7000. That was the world’s first body-integrated AF camera.

/home/wpcom/public_html/wp-content/blogs.dir/083/1272551/files/2014/12/img_2696.jpg

A few years later, I added what is still my favourite camera, the Minolta 9000. Titanium body, with both manual and motorised film advance, spot metering, and a bunch of other features, I loved this camera.

/home/wpcom/public_html/wp-content/blogs.dir/083/1272551/files/2014/12/img_2680.jpg

I used to run both the 7000 and 9000, with B&W in the 7000, and Fuji Velvia slide film in the 9000. I’d still be running both these cameras, except (sadly), the digital photographic age dawned. I stayed away for quite a while, but when Minolta (then Konica-Minolta) came out with their digital SLR, the impressive 6MP 7D, I was tempted to the darkside.

/home/wpcom/public_html/wp-content/blogs.dir/083/1272551/files/2014/12/img_2693.jpg

Unlike film cameras, digital cameras have a definite lifespan, and while my 7000 and 9000 are still working fine, the 7D died a few years later. This was replaced with a camera that I really suffered, the Sony A55. (Minolta had departed the photographic scene by that point, and had sold everything over to Sony, including the A mount). It was the end of the Minolta/Sony SLR, as in this case, the mirror is fixed, and there is no optical viewfinder with pentaprism head, so no longer a reflex. Instead the mirror is semi-transparent, and it is known as an SLT, or single-lens translucent. One advantage of this is the high frame rates now possible, with the A55 able to run up to 10fps.

/home/wpcom/public_html/wp-content/blogs.dir/083/1272551/files/2014/12/img_2682.jpg

While functional, the lack of control, and overall quality of the images has been a source of frustration, so with it also reaching end-of-life (prematurely), the latest body has been added to my collection.

The Sony A77 Mk ii.

/home/wpcom/public_html/wp-content/blogs.dir/083/1272551/files/2014/12/img_2683.jpg

I’m loving this camera. There is so much control over it, it is taking a bit of a learning curve, but with 24MP SLT, 12FPS, vertical grip, etc etc, it is proving a fun camera to use.

While the body was not cheap, the real splurge has been the new lens.

A Carl Zeiss 24-70 f2.8

/home/wpcom/public_html/wp-content/blogs.dir/083/1272551/files/2014/12/img_2694.jpg

This is a drool-worthy lens. Over 900g (twice the weight of the lens it is replacing), 77mm front end, a constant f2.8, and Zeiss glass.

First trials indicate this is an impressive combination of camera and lens. We will have it in the workshop soon enough, and although it probably won’t improve the online offerings much, it should make a difference to the printed articles, and allow me to easily get sharp images once again.

Monarch Clock

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

 

Multiple Layer Inlay Stencils, from Tarter Woodworking.  The Monarch Butterfly is just one of a range of designs available.

The design is an absolute show stopper.  I took the completed piece in to show my wife and daughter, and during the ‘countdown’ to the reveal, “3, 2, …. ” well they never got to 1. As the work was revealed, they were stunned to silence.  I have never gotten such a reaction to anything I’ve ever made before!  Even having seen the work in progress, the final result was even more incredible than they had imagined, and, well, I’m pretty pleased with the result too :)

For the full writeup, including all the in-progress photos, check out the next edition of ManSpace Magazine (Feb 2015).

 

Episode 110 Multiple Layer Inlay Stencils

This episode uses one of the MLIS (Multiple Layer Inlay Stencils) from Tarter Woodworking.

Good product, great results, and a very realistic price to boot.  What’s not to love?

The template used here is the Yin Yang.  I did try the Clownfish, but have to come back to that for a second attempt (got my order of steps wrong!)  I’ve also just started on the Monarch Butterfly, which is a lot easier than the clownfish (despite being massive in comparison), and fun.

Template Inlays

I first came across the concept of template inlays back when I was working on a poker table concept, back in 2009.  This was a pretty basic form – a simple shape and a contrasting piece of timber.

What I have come across recently, lifts that basic concept into the stratosphere!  It is a similar concept to the multiple templates used with the 3D router carver

Over at Tarter Woodworking, the concept of template inlays has been taken to a logical conclusion – using multiple templates (and the use of different timbers) to create stunning inlay results.

Results like this Clownfish…

clown

which happens to be one of the smaller templates, but is one of my favourites.  It is not painted on – it is multiple timbers routed and inlaid.

The templates are very reasonably priced – this clownfish template is a whole $US11.50

clownstencil

Bit of a confession however – I have a few templates here, begging to me to try them out and I haven’t (yet)!  I went to do so last weekend, then discovered a slight problem.  Having replaced my Triton handheld routers with a Festool, I didn’t have the adapter to fit the Porter Cable-style template guide rings!

That I rectified first thing Monday morning, so I am ready to go as soon as I find a couple of minutes to rub together.

Think I will probably tackle the clownfish first, but then, there is the Monarch butterfly to try.  That will take a good assortment of timbers to make the design come to life.

Monarch_full_with_stencil Monarch_Stencil_-_used MONARCH1

So looking forward to trying these out for myself – this weekend if all goes to plan (and I find my shed again under the mountain of mess and sawdust from last weekend’s rush build)!

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 1,796 other followers

%d bloggers like this: