Killing a blade softly

As mentioned recently, I had an opportunity to demonstrate the SawStop Industrial (5HP) to a group from the Instrumentation & Technology Development Facility (Monash Instrumentation Facility), and the Faculty of Science, both from Monash University.

The following video was taken and edited by Steve Morton, from the Scientific Imaging Service within the Faculty of Science, Monash University.  Used with permission.

Nova Infinity System

No longer a myth, rumour or figment, the Nova Infinity Chuck system is readily available.

As far as the design goes, it is good engineering. You should always try to design a system that fails safe, and a system that holds true even if part of the system fails is well designed.

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The direction the jaws attach to the chuck is not the same direction as the centripetal forces that is trying to pull the jaws off the chuck. That is good basic design.

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I’ll demonstrate upgrading a current SuperNova2 chuck to the Infinity shortly, so watch this space!

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Monarch Clock

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Multiple Layer Inlay Stencils, from Tarter Woodworking.  The Monarch Butterfly is just one of a range of designs available.

The design is an absolute show stopper.  I took the completed piece in to show my wife and daughter, and during the ‘countdown’ to the reveal, “3, 2, …. ” well they never got to 1. As the work was revealed, they were stunned to silence.  I have never gotten such a reaction to anything I’ve ever made before!  Even having seen the work in progress, the final result was even more incredible than they had imagined, and, well, I’m pretty pleased with the result too :)

For the full writeup, including all the in-progress photos, check out the next edition of ManSpace Magazine (Feb 2015).

 

Precision Engineering

I was over at the Monash Instrumentation Facility at Monash Uni today for a bit of a look around, and to give a demonstration of their SawStop in action.

Awesome workshop, from electronic design and construction, instrumentation through to fabrication and manufacture.

They have an increasing number of industrial CNC machines and a 3D printer, but the one thing that impressed me the most was an assembly table, representing the best of German engineering.

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Stunning table, about 1″ thick. Cost a pretty penny too- around $25000.

Did a couple of SawStop demos on their 5HP, 3Ph Industrial SawStop

That has some power! Awesome machine :)

Yin Yang

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Now working on the monarch butterfly. Going well- lots of routing, but overall a straightforward design. 9 templates, and a 500mm wide design, but not complicated to do, still will be awesome when finished.

Episode 110 Multiple Layer Inlay Stencils

This episode uses one of the MLIS (Multiple Layer Inlay Stencils) from Tarter Woodworking.

Good product, great results, and a very realistic price to boot.  What’s not to love?

The template used here is the Yin Yang.  I did try the Clownfish, but have to come back to that for a second attempt (got my order of steps wrong!)  I’ve also just started on the Monarch Butterfly, which is a lot easier than the clownfish (despite being massive in comparison), and fun.

Walko vs Festool

Been doing some handheld routing on the Festool MFT, the results of which you’ll be able to see in the next video.  I’ve been using the Festool surface clamps for much of the operation, but have been surprised to find that over time, the Walko surface clamps (which are 2/3rds the price) are actually doing a better job! (Festool $150 pair, Walko $99 pair)

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Festool Surface Clamp

 

Walko Surface Clamp

Walko Surface Clamp

(Just did an image search for both – the top 4 images of the Walko clamp all came from Stu’s Shed!)

Granted that the Festool is probably a better design, I guess, with a longer reach, the ability to secure it to the table from underneath, and I am sure there are one or two other features over the Walko.

However there is one overriding difference.  The Festool jams when you try to release it.  The Walko doesn’t.  After a while, the Festool also doesn’t slide smoothly, whereas the Walkos I have, have been going and going for years without incident.

Looking closely at the shaft of the Festool, and it is pitted along its length, dented by the securing mechanism.  Sure, I can file these off (and already have a couple of times), but it is an inherent flaw.  The metal of the shaft of the Festool surface clamp is wrong – it is too soft.  Whereas the Walko clamp has got it just right.

Not often that something is able to out-perform Festool, but in this case, something has!

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